?

Log in

So what are you doing New Year's Eve? Watching the ball drop from the comfort of your sofa because you just didn't get invited to a good party? Well, take a step back in time, when they really knew how to whoop it up.

These gals must have been freezing.

new-years-eve-1933

Probably the 1940s. How do you get confetti out of your hair?

vintage-party-640x330

1930s or 1940s.

old-new-years-eve

1950s.

50s-new-years-eve

1941.

1941-new-years-eve

World War II.

31876a2e34187144d178ae5c0a7c3e24

1950s.

7500355_orig

1950s.

article-2254718-16ACAE57000005DC-2_964x787

So get out there tonight and party like it's 1949!

NOSTALGIC CHRISTMAS PHOTOS

Oh dearie me, poor little community, so long neglected! Here are a few photos from out of the past:

I love the simple, practical but well-designed clothes these kids are wearing.

3. The predictable gifts. Dolls for girls...

Something about this photo makes me think it was taken in England.

54ebe07abf1d1_-_xmas7\\

Tinsel that really draped well.

The trees enshrouded in tinsel.

Does anyone dress up for Christmas dinner any more? And if not, why not?

54ebe0791d57e_-_xmas6

Actual socks, not fancy factory-made stockings! And MORE TINSEL!

The simple stockings hanging off the mantelpiece.

This could be a scene from my hometown many years ago....

54ebe0841c640_-_xmas12

A sweet scene.

54ebe08915610_-_xmas14

HAPPY HANUKKAH

I did a search for vintage Hanukkah images and was surprised to find so few. If I spelled it Chanukah a few different ones showed up, but mostly the images were modern-day.


Soldiers celebrating Hanukkah outside in Korea.

Soldiers celebrating Hanukah outside in Korea

Chanukah, 1956.

Chanukah, 1956

Making Chanukkah decorations at Temple of Aaron, St. Paul, Minnesota, 1960.

Making Chanukkah decorations at Temple of Aaron, St. Paul. Photograph Collection 1960,

In London, Jewish Free School students lighting the first night candle back in the 1960s.

Jewish Free School students, lighting the first night candle back in the 1960s.

Apparently a stage musical.

Hanukkah_7

THANKSGIVING IN THE 1940S

I sometimes feel like I should have been around in the 1940s. That's the decade my parents talked about the most, what it was like during WWII. It was the last gasp, I think, before the really rapid growth of the US took place in that century - along with a dizzying array of modern conveniences, high-speed transportation, suburbia, and so forth. And because I grew up in a rural area, I identify with a lot of these photos.

Read more...Collapse )

VINTAGE FOOD PHOTOS

I have been invited to an engagement party-slash-retro-foods-extravaganza. The theme is Mad Men without the smoking and misogyny, and everyone is supposed to bring a dish made from one of those old cookbooks - you know, the scary cookbooks that involve lots of Spam, pineapple, hot dogs, and "interesting" combinations.

I think the reason everyone was thin back in the 1950s was because the food was so horrible.

I haven't quite decided what to bring (so much bad food! So little time!) but here are a few examples of Cuisine de la Suburbia.

A step back in time.Collapse )

JUNE 6, 1944

My father served in the army during WWII. I learned a great deal about it from both parents. My mother said that in early June, the homefront suddenly stopped getting news from the war, and everyone knew something big was about to happen. The news of the Allied Invasion of Europe broke on June 6.

Read more...Collapse )

BATHING SUITS

I hate looking for a new bathing suit. The last time (a few years ago) was about as much fun as dental surgery and I wound up spending a shocking amount of money. I suppose that's nothing new.... but in years past, no one worried about how they looked. Everything was covered!

Which way to the beach?Collapse )

MEMORIAL DAY

Already by the spring of 1864. the Union dead had completely filled the military cemeteries of Washington and Alexandria. Secretary of War Stanton ordered the Quartermaster General, Montgomery Meigs, to choose a new site. Meigs was a Georgian who had once served under Lee in the peacetime army, but he had developed an intense hatred for all southerners who fought against the Union he still served. Without hesitation, he picked Robert E. Lee's lawn at Arlington for the new army cemetery and ordered that the Union dead be laid to rest within a few feet of the front door of the man he blamed for their deaths, so that no one could ever again live in the house.

In August, Meigs personally inspected the site and was furious to find that he had been disobeyed: officers stationed there had buried the first bodies out of sight, in a distant corner of the estate once reserved for the burial of slaves. He immediately ordered that twenty-six Union coffins be brought to Arlington and then watched personally as they were lowered into the earth in a ring around Mrs. Lee's old rose garden. Later, he would order built at the center of that garden a Tomb of the Unknown Dead, filled with the anonymous bones of eleven hundred soldiers, gathered from unmarked graves on battlefields within twenty-five miles of Washington.

In October, Meigs's own son, Lieutenant John R. Meigs, killed by Confederate guerrillas in the Shenandoah Campaign, was buried in his father's old commander's lawn.

The men Grant was sending to fight Robert E. Lee were being buried in Robert E. Lee's own front yard. That yard became Arlington National Cemetery, the Union's most hallowed ground
. - The Civil War, Geoffrey C. Ward, Ken Burns, & Ric Burns

Read more...Collapse )

A VINTAGE HONEYMOON

A man in England was cleaning out his grandfather's possessions and found these wonderful photos of his honeymoon in pre-WWII England.

Come back to an idyllic land.....Collapse )









Profile

holiday wrapping paper
vintageholiday
vintageholiday

Latest Month

December 2015
S M T W T F S
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031